Git: Push a new repository

create a new repository on the command line

echo "# helm-nexus" >> README.md
git init
git add README.md
git commit -m "first commit"
git remote add origin https://github.com/{username}/helm-nexus.git
git push -u origin master

…or push an existing repository from the command line

git remote add origin https://github.com/{username}/helm-nexus.git
git push -u origin master
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cannot create directory : Permission denied

I had created a directory mkdir xyz with user centos

The following is the output of ll command:
drw——-. 2 centos centos 6 Oct 6 06:11 xyz

When I executed cd xyz I received the following error:
bash: cd: xyz/: Permission denied

I could not access the directory in any case
mkdir xyz/abc
touch xyz/test.txt
All returned the same error.

The solution for this is to add +x permission on the directory.
chmod 700 xyz/
Then I could cd into the directory and create files and folders.

The logic behind this is as belows:

Read bit = If set, you can read this list. So, for example, if you have a directory named poems:

  • You can ls poems and you’ll get a list of items living within (-l won’t reveal any details!).
  • You can use command-line completion i.e. touch poems/so <TAB> poems/somefile.
  • You cannot make poems your working directory (i.e. cd into it).

Write bit = If set, you can modify this list i.e. you can {add,rename,delete} names on it. But! You can actually do it only if the execute bit is set too.

Execute bit = Make this directory your working directory i.e. cd into it. You need this permission if you want to:

  • access (read, write, execute) items living within.
  • modify the list itself i.e. add, rename, delete names on it (of course the write bit must be set on the directory).

Interesting case 1: If you have write + execute permissions on a directory, you can {delete,rename} items living within even if you don’t have write perimission on those items. (use sticky bit to prevent this)

Interesting case 2: If you have execute (but not write) permission on a directory AND you have write permission on a file living within, you cannot delete the file (because it involves removing it from the list). However, you can erase its contents e.g. if it’s a text file you can use vi to open it and delete everything. The file will still be there, but it will be empty.

So the solution is to add +x to the directory.
You will be able to cd into the directory even if you don’t have +x if you are the root user.

Setting your username in Git

Git uses a username to associate commits with an identity. The Git username is not the same as your GitHub username.

You can change the name that is associated with your Git commits using the git config command. The new name you set will be visible in any future commits you push to GitHub from the command line. If you’d like to keep your real name private, you can use any text as your Git username.

Changing the name associated with your Git commits using git config will only affect future commits and will not change the name used for past commits.

Setting your Git username for every repository on your computer

  1. Open Git Bash.
  2. Set a Git username:
    $ git config --global user.name "Mona Lisa"
    
  3. Confirm that you have set the Git username correctly:
    $ git config --global user.name
    > Mona Lisa
    

Setting your Git username for a single repository

  1. Open Git Bash.
  2. Change the current working directory to the local repository where you want to configure the name that is associated with your Git commits.
  3. Set a Git username:
    $ git config user.name "Mona Lisa"
    
  4. Confirm that you have set the Git username correctly:
    $ git config user.name
    > Mona Lisa