Automating Slapd Install

You could execute the following command:

export DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive
debconf-set-selections <<< ‘slapd/root_password password 123123’
debconf-set-selections <<< ‘slapd/root_password_again 123123’
apt-get install slapd ldap-utils -y

Or for a more complex installation you can use:
cat > /root/debconf-slapd.conf << ‘EOF’
slapd slapd/password1 password admin
slapd slapd/internal/adminpw password admin
slapd slapd/internal/generated_adminpw password admin
slapd slapd/password2 password admin
slapd slapd/unsafe_selfwrite_acl note
slapd slapd/purge_database boolean false
slapd slapd/domain string phys.ethz.ch
slapd slapd/ppolicy_schema_needs_update select abort installation
slapd slapd/invalid_config boolean true
slapd slapd/move_old_database boolean false
slapd slapd/backend select MDB
slapd shared/organization string ETH Zurich
slapd slapd/dump_database_destdir string /var/backups/slapd-VERSION
slapd slapd/no_configuration boolean false
slapd slapd/dump_database select when needed
slapd slapd/password_mismatch note
EOF
export DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive
cat /root/debconf-slapd.conf | debconf-set-selections
apt install ldap-utils slapd -y

The possible attributes for debconf-set-selections are defined in the slapd.templates file in the debian package, together with a description of what the configuration attribute is about.

For slapd on Debian Jessie, you can find the file here: https://anonscm.debian.org/cgit/pkg-openldap/openldap.git/tree/debian/slapd.templates?h=jessie

 

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An Easy Way to Hide Files and Directories in Linux

Do you occasionally share your Linux desktop machine with family members, friends or perhaps with colleagues at your workplace, then you have a reason to hide certain private files as well as folders or directories. The question is how can you do this?

In this tutorial, we will explain an easy and effective way to hide files and directories and view hidden files/directories in Linux from the terminal and GUI.

As we’ll see below, hiding files and directories in Linux is so simple.

How to Hide Files and Directories in Linux

To hide a file or directory from the terminal, simply append a dot . at the start of its name as follows using the mv command.

$ ls
$ mv mv sync.ffs_db .sync.ffs_db
$ ls

Hide File in Linux Terminal

Using GUI method, the same idea applies here, just rename the file by adding a . at the start of its name as shown below.

Hide File in Linux Using File Manager

Once you have renamed it, the file will still be seen, move out of the directory and open it again, it will be hidden thereafter.

How to View Hide Files and Directories in Linux

To view hidden files, run the ls command with the -a flag which enables viewing of all files in a directory or -al flag for long listing.

$ ls -a
OR
$ ls -al

View Hidden Files in Linux Terminal

From a GUI file manager, go to View and check the option Show Hidden Files to view hidden files or directories.

View Hidden File Using File Manager

How to Compress Files and Directories with a Password

In order to add a little security to your hidden files, you can compress them with a password and then hide them from a GUI file manager as follows.

Select the file or directory and right click on it, then choose Compress from the menu list, after seeing the compression preferences interface, click on “Other options” to get the password option as shown in the screenshot below.

Once you have set the password, click on Create.

Compress Files with Password in Linux

From now on, each time anyone wants to open the file, they’ll be asked to provide the password created above.

Enter Password to View Files

Now you can hide the file by renaming it with a . as we explained before.